► Few Survivors: July 2, 2017

Sunday 2 July 2017

Journey: Triple L Estate – Calvert Marina, Solomons, MD – Onancock, VA

We first prepared for our departure to Onancock on Virginia’s eastern shore. We had been told it’s a little town reinventing itself to be an artsy bohemia like town. We stopped at Calvert Marina for fueling.

After fueling we headed out for our journey down the Bay and over to the eastern shore. Fortunately, we had great weather with flat water for our journey. We had hoped to see M/V September Song along the way.

post 8896 sv sigsbee baltimore mdPassed by Sigsbee, a Chesapeake Bay skipjack, built in 1901 in Deal Island, Maryland and now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Skipjacks, Maryland’s state boat, are traditional fishing boats used on the Chesapeake Bay for oyster dredging. S/V Sigsbee, named for Charles Sigsbee, the commanding officer aboard the Battleship MAINE which was sunk in Havana harbor at the beginning of the Spanish-American War, has an overall length of 75 ft, a 47 ft-long “V”-bottomed deadrise type of centerboard sloop with a 15.8 ft beam and a 3.8 ft draft. Approximately 35 traditional Chesapeake Bay skipjacks survive.

post 8910 sigsbee baltimore md brightness contrast -63 42“Oystermen needed a light, inexpensive boat that was easy to construct and could navigate the shallower waters of the Bay. The skipjack’s wide beam, hard chine, and low freeboard provided a stable, large working and storage platform. The single-masted rig, with sharp-headed mainsail and large jib, was easy to handle, powerful in light winds, and capable of coming about quickly without losing way. All these traits made the skipjack ideally suited to performing continuous “licks” (passes) over the oyster beds. The skipjack was also so simple to build that even house carpenters could construct one.”

The length of the boom should equal the length on deck. The length of the bowsprit should equal the width on deck or “beam.” The height of the mast should equal the length on deck plus the beam.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigsbee_(skipjack)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipjack_(boat)
http://www.baydreaming.com/about-the-chesapeake-bay/chesapeake-bay-skipjacks/
http://lastskipjacks.com
https://livingclassrooms.org/sigsbee_facts.php

post 8970 lighthouse

It’s always entertaining to see the variety of vessels out and about on the Bay.

Traveling to a new location also tests our navigational and chart reading skills.

post 9123 tangier island

We passed near Tangier Island … so worried all of a sudden about climate change but voted for Trump and Republican candidates…. Boo hoo, you got what you voted for.

As we entered Onancock Creek that would eventually lead us to Onancock, we passed by a local gathering place where boats lined up along a nice stretch of beach.

From Onancock signage:

‘Hard by this spot is the site of the home of Francis Makemie, the founder of organized Presbyterianism in America. who married Naomie Anderson of Accomack County, Virginia and established one of his first licensed preaching places here in his Onancock home October ye 5th, 1699.’

‘Historic Cokesbury Church
Congregation founded – 1784
Present church built – 1854’

“Historic Cemetery: Known as the Scott Hall Cemetery, it dates from the late 18th century. Here will be found the grave of Commodore Whaley of the Maryland Navy who was killed in the Battle of the Barges in the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of Onancock Creek in November 1782. Also buried here are: Colonel George Corbin, soldier of the Revolution who died September of 1793, his daughter Agnes Corbin Ker (1813) and son-in-law John Shepherd Ker (1806) the builder of Ker Place and successful merchant, along with other Ker family members.”

‘In Memory of Genl. Edmund R. Bagwell. Born June 2, 1840. Died June 13, 1876. His life was gentle and the elements So mixed in him that *** might stand up And say in all the World. This was a man.’

post 9232 barn

We walked around town, expecting an artsy bohemian community. That’s not we found. We finally wound up at Mallard’s restaurant which had a performer for entertainment.

Because of Virginia’s low cost vanity plates, there are many clever plates to read.

We then returned to the boat. I enjoyed the view watching people pass by on vessels, or on the road. A nice relaxing way to spend an evening.

Night at Onancock Wharf, VA, slip 14

 

 

Hrs: 267.1/266.2 – 270.6/269.6
Time: LV: Triple L @ 8:55 am, LV: Solomons Island @ 9:30 am – AR: Onancock @ 12:45 pm
Gauge read: 33.7 gallons used at end of journey
Conditions: pleasant, fairly flat to flat water – always a fantastic way to travel on the Bay; sunny bright day
Vessel: ‘Gurlz Gotta Eat’
Passengers: Captain K, Admiral L, and Sophie

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: